• 0

From ITSA House to Host Family: Experiencing a new side of Ahmedabad

After nearly 6 weeks of living together in the ITSA house, the thought of home-stays, of separating from the house and each other, was daunting for some of the seven ITSA interns. I was excited to be welcomed into someone else’s home and curious about my home-stay family, but I was also nervous to leave the area we all knew so much about—to say goodbye to the chai wallah on the corner who I buy tea from each morning and to the little street-food shop down the street where we buy midnight snacks, pav vada and veg puffs. More than anything, I was sad to not be living with the other interns, who by now are an adopted family. The thought of saying goodbye to our late night chats, our morning race for honey cornflakes, our movie nights and Bollywood music sharing sessions, the thought of moving out, was difficult.
READ MORE

  • 0
  • 1
  • 2

More than just a field trip

In our most recent workshop, we went on a field trip to the museum of conflict, better known as “The Conflictorium.”  Their description reads , “The Conflictorium, Museum of Conflict is a space that invites people to participate, co-create, experiment, collaborate, study, read and engage in a process of meaning making. So come here to showcase or appreciate up-and-coming talents-musical, intellectual, artistic-or use this free spaces for any other activity that relates to the city or makes us grow as people…”
READ MORE

  • 0
  • 1

Beyond Black and White: Seeing Education in a New Light

“But what is the right answer?” a workshop participant asked me. We were having a small-group discussion on possible ways to socio-economically uplift Dalit women who are considered to be untouchable in the Indian caste system. A year back, I probably would have chosen the ‘best’ answer that had been offered during the discussion and urged students to think about why it was right. And if I were participating in the workshop, I might just have asked that question too.READ MORE

Old Habits Die Hard: The Stubborn Specter of Traditional Education

There’s a reason this organization is called ITSA and not SAIT, and it’s more than just verbal aesthetics. It is no coincidence that “independent thought” comes before “social action.” Whatever social action we try to inspire and foster in our workshop participants is subordinate to independent thought. When we talk about “igniting the flame of social change,” there is no question that that flame is located squarely in the human mind.
READ MORE
  • 0

Project Symposium

Today was the ITSA 2013 Project Symposium! Over the course of the workshops, students have been encouraged to think about which social issues they are interested in. Then, they have to think about a project that they can implement in their community to help fix this issue. These project proposal is what the ITSA workshops are all about.
However, this year, there is an exciting twist!

READ MORE

  • 0

Closing Ceremony

Today was the closing ceremony of the ITSA workshops 2013!

I just have to say that I am so incredibly proud of all the young people who presented their newly funded projects today. It is truly amazing how you have chosen specific issues, and are really dedicated to solving those issues.READ MORE

  • 0
  • 1

Rajkot

For a few days, the ITSA team is going to Rajkot! We had an intensive two day workshop series at the The Galaxy Education System (TGES). After a very eventful, yet comfortable, sleeper bus ride, we finally made it to Rajkot. We had prepared everything for the days to come. But first it was Isabel’s 21st birthday! So we had to have a midnight celebration with cake, naturally.

READ MORE

DSC_0286

Saturday Event–Development in Gujarat

ITSA hosted its second Speak Off this Saturday. We didn’t have a guest lecturer this week, and we still had a great discussion. There were no shortages of opinions. There was a good point brought up about balance in development. There has to be a balance between the old and the new, the urban and rural, the social and economic development. If there is too much of one without the other, the development is not going to be sustainable. READ MORE